Coaching

Georgia:
Coaching has been a journey on its own. Before I used to think coaching was quite simple, you get on with it. I’ve been around a lot of coaches, and I think, “Oh yeah, yeah, that’s good, you can do it.” And assistant coaching, you can easily just tap into things and add.

Craig:
Yeah, it’s a whole different-

Georgia:
That’s not the case! That is so not the case! With performing, it is very much about yourself in that sense. You may work with a team, and things like this, and especially in stunts, usually you have a stunt group, and it’s much more team based. But in a lot of performance jobs, it’s been about you. You do it, you get your job done, you know what you can do, you know your limits.

Georgia:
Coaching is so much more. It’s no longer about you. You have these other practitioners who come to you who want to learn something from you, and want to learn something about themselves, or at least I hope. So now you’ve got to think about who are these people. They have their own lives, they have their own experiences, they have their own limitations, their own fears, all these kind of things that you’ve been managing, you had other people managing for you, or you’ve been managing yourself, and/or, should I say. But now you are in that position to do that for someone else, and it’s a feat on its own of, “How do I help this person? What do they need right now? Can I give that to them? Am I the person that can actually help them right now? Do they want that help?”

Georgia:
In the assistant coaching I did before I was with Esprit Concrete, it was very much about technique. You ask any practitioner, they know that there’s a mental side to it, and there’s a physical side to training, and these two things go hand in hand. We have a lot of mental obstacles, and we have a lot of physical obstacles in our training. But the general way of coaching parkour has been mostly on the physical side. Well, it’s the technique, you teach them this. And you can still help them on the mental side, but it never had quite as much focus on it.

Georgia:
Then when … Yao was my mentor when I first started. He took me in, and he trained me up. Then when him and Kasturi made Esprit Concrete, I joined them. I wanted to go with my mentor. That’s where I really started to understand, or started to learn what a coach should be, or what a coach should value in their training as a coach, or how they should value their students and how they should hep them. We focus a lot more on the mental aspect of it as well.

Georgia:
So I started to meet students that I never would’ve met before. We’ve worked with all sorts. We’ve worked with charities, we’ve worked with different students of all sorts, there’s so many to speak about. It has been a whole new education on its own for me, because it also changed the way I thought about myself, or how I managed myself. Seeing so many similarities in the struggles and the fears the students had, it gave me motivation to work on these things myself, because if I couldn’t manage it myself, if I couldn’t face that fear myself, how could help that student do it? It didn’t feel right.

Georgia:
And this is something I came to understand, is that to help your student, you also need to be able to help yourself, and manage yourself. Also, you can’t do the two in the session, so you need to be managing yourself at your own point in order to make sure that student gets what they need in that session, and you’re not part of that, but you’re there to help. You can offer that. And it required a lot of self-reflection. There’s been times where I’ve come back from a session, I’ve cried, because I’m just like, “What about … We discussed this. I can’t believe I’ve done this. I haven’t helped this way. This didn’t work.” It was also a lot of self-reflection on myself of, “Wow, there’s so much I need to work on, and these habits come into place, and I want to be a good coach for our students.”