On parkour for deconditioned persons

Sean: Yeah, and so once we had our people, now I’m trying to figure out, “What am I going to make them do?” Because I had an idea of what people should do, and I’ve taught older Parkour classes, and in my training experience I’ve dealt with rehabilitation with people in their 60s coming off of surgeries, coming off of cancer, coming off of, you know all the vagaries of life, and trying to get back to it. I wasn’t shooting blind, but I wasn’t seeing them, so I had to be extremely detailed for the coaches about what exactly we’re going to do.

Sean: It was such a fun challenge because I’m thinking, “Okay, I’ve got scared 80 year olds on week one, and by week eight I’ve got to get them in a park doing obstacle courses.” How do you fill that gap, you know. I’ve done this for kids and teenagers, and young-ish adults mostly, what’s that gap look like for an 80 year old? I hadn’t dealt with the question in that kind of detail yet, and what that brought out, and what’s going to fuel the next phase of our curriculum in PK Move, is understanding that posture and balance just on one point, actually not locomotion.

Craig: We both just sat up straighter.

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On what parkour brings to older persons

Sean: What’s fun about confronting the challenge and perception about why Parkour and grandma, how does that mix? So you can ask kind of a leading questions like, “You’re asking me that because you think Parkour is like people falling off the roof.”

Craig: Right.

Sean: My answer to that is, “Yes, Parkour is about people falling off the roof, and controlling their impact, and disbursing it correctly, and chaining that to a different type of locomotion with no fear, and no problems, and no long-lasting knee damage if you train for it correctly.” Is there anything useful about that for a population whose number one cause of death every year is falling down? Yes.

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On PK Move curriculum development

Craig: Sean, I mentioned in the introduction that you’re part of the PK Move Board, but it think it’s also important for people to know that you were really critical, according to Nancy and her team you were really critical in the curriculum development for PK Silver. I think that people may not be aware of the level of work that went into getting from the idea of how to teach Parkour to people, to making it actually be something that can be done reproducibly and safely, so I would love to hear more about how much of that you’d want to unpack.

Sean: As you might imagine the number one reaction, and really the only reaction I get when I tell somebody, “Yeah, I teach Parkour to grandma,” is like, “How? How does that work?” It’s pretty obvious why that reaction comes through because our reputation-

Craig: Precedes us.

Sean: Precedes us, right. So the fun thing about that … the challenging thing about is on two tracks, working on the perception, and then actually developing the curriculum that will actually change the perception. It is a big challenge [inaudible 00:02:14], I developed a curriculum before for everyone ages 3 to 35, assuming a certain level of fitness, that’s a certain type of Parkour, and that’s the one that everybody knows about, that most people even in their 20s think, “It’s going to kill me if I try it.”

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051. Sean Hannah: Full transcript

Craig: Welcome to the Movers Mindset podcast, where I interview movement enthusiasts to find out who they are, what they do, and why they do it. Today, Sean Hannah takes us deep into curriculum development, how he researches, the importance of games and fun, and developing with specific audiences in mind. He discusses his role in designing the curriculum for the PK Move Study with Marymount University, and the specific challenges it presented. Sean shares advice on coaching and designing for adults and seniors before unpacking his current personal curriculum and goals.

Craig: Hello. I’m Craig Constantine.

Sean: Hi, I’m Sean Hannah.

Craig: Sean Hannah is a coach, athlete, and curriculum developer, currently based in Colorado. Before moving out West, Sean spent years as the lead coach at Urban Evolution in Alexandria, Virginia, developing their curriculum. Sean’s background in rehab and personal training also led to his involvement in the PK Silver Program development, and he is a member of the PK Move Board. Sean dislikes shoes and being on the ground. Welcome, Sean.

Sean: Happy to be here, Craig.

Craig: Sean, I mentioned in the introduction that you’re part of the PK Move Board, but it think it’s also important for people to know that you were really critical, according to Nancy and her team you were really critical in the curriculum development for PK Silver. I think that people may not be aware of the level of work that went into getting from the idea of how to teach Parkour to people, to making it actually be something that can be done reproducibly and safely, so I would love to hear more about how much of that you’d want to unpack.

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051. Sean Hannah: Designing curriculum, teaching seniors, and the mid-range

051. Sean Hannah: Designing curriculum, teaching seniors, and the mid-range

 
 
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Sean Hannah takes us deep into curriculum development; how he researches, the importance of games and fun, and developing with specific audiences in mind. He discusses his role in designing the curriculum for the PK Move Study with Marymount University, and the specific challenges it presented. Sean shares advice on coaching and designing for adults and seniors, before unpacking his current personal curriculum and goals. 

Continue Reading…