Three words to describe your practice

Craig:
So, the prompt… That’s fine. So, the prompt is normally I would give this prompt to everyone and we would cut it out, but I think it’s fun to leave it in in this case. So, the prompt is picking three words is really tough because it forces you to over simplify and at the same time try and find words that are super powerful. So, I’m curious to see what three words people pick under direst to describe their practice. But there is also the next level up which is you have to either literally outwardly or at least in your head unpack what I mean or what you think I mean by the word practice.

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Gyms

Tyson:
It lasted a little bit. I really like experimenting to find optimal solutions. That’s a big part of my parkour practice too. It’s like I find a challenge that peaks my interest and I try to find the best way for me to maneuver myself from one point to another within that… having that challenge in mind. And I can get really in depth into that where everybody else within the training group or whatever goes off and does something else and I’m like, “No, I still have to do this thing, and I can’t touch this thing because I really want to try this one movement and I don’t have it yet, so I’m going to keep going at it.” And that’s just, I think, a part of my personality.

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Parkour Vision

Tyson:
Yeah. So, this is why we named the organization Parkour Visions because for me one of the most powerful things for getting into parkour was how it changed my view of the entire world. I could entertain myself by just walking around in the city and imagining all the different things that I could do in those areas, and that also led me to grabbing every railing that I saw to test how strong it was, and just running my hands over the texture of different things so that I could get a feel for, “Oh, this tends to be slippery when it’s dusty. This one seems to be a lot better,” and doing those sort of things every single day no matter when it was that I went. I definitely had those thoughts of, “Well, crap. They should’ve just done this and then this railing would’ve been way, way more strong and I would’ve been able to jump on it,” even if I was just jumping on it in my head and I didn’t have time to do then, it’s still disappointing me that they just didn’t do it that way. And so having those thoughts just constantly all the time I’m sure influenced the way that I would come to design and build obstacles.

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Building

Tyson:
It’s like I have my own practice at this point and I know the things that make me feel fulfilled from the movements that I do. So, the traveling I think that I want to do now is to go to my friends and other leaders within the parkour communities and to see the spaces of the programs that they built and the challenges and the obstacles that they’ve had to overcome in getting there and to see if I can offer ways to help and develop that or to even challenge some of the beliefs that they’ve built up over what they think works best for their situation. So, that’s kind of what I’m imagining my next progression to be. I really enjoy the building arm of this and I really enjoy doing really unique and interesting things that push the limit, and I would love to just find more people who are willing to take that step and be like, “What would happen if we just cut a tree and brought it in here and flipped it upside down and used that as a start of a really cool precision bar scaffolding course?” And be like, “Yeah, that sounds great. Let’s do that.”

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Problem Solver

Tyson:
So, I think it comes down to I enjoy helping people, I enjoy spreading the things that I’m passionate about, it’s just currently I just get so easily stuck in these ruts of it not feeling like I’m going to enjoy it. I was so stressed before my presentation at the Art of Retreat. It was just destroying me and I knew perfectly well that I would have a fun presentation and I knew perfectly well that people were going to learn stuff from it, but what I don’t think that I understood was that I was going to have that much fun doing it because I don’t know. It all just felt like a drag. It all just felt like, oh, this is just more ways to not meet either my expectations or other people’s expectations. There isn’t particularly an answer to it.

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074. Tyson Cecka: Full Transcript

Craig: Welcome to the Movers Mindset podcast where I interview movement enthusiasts to find out who they are, what they do, and why they do it. In this interview, Tyson Cecka unpacks his design process, how he began to build the parkour obstacles, and where he finds inspiration. He discusses his current plans and goals and explains why he doesn’t consider himself a great artist or creator. Tyson shares his experiences with depression, how it’s affected his life, and how he’s working through it. Hello, I’m Craig Constantine.

Tyson: Hello, I am Tyson.

Craig: Tyson Cecka is well known in the parkour community for his innovative parkour design and construction work. In addition to being an athlete and coach, a co-founder of Parkour Visions, Tyson stepped down from leadership with the organization in 2017 after 10 years as its executive director. He also started STURDYmade, an awesome online community of parkour builders involving videos, plans, reference projects and experiments. Welcome, Tyson.

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074. Tyson Cecka: Obstacles, artistry, and depression

074. Tyson Cecka: Obstacles, artistry, and depression

 
 
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Tyson Cecka unpacks his design process, how he began to build parkour obstacles, and where he finds inspiration. He discusses his current plans and goals, and explains why he doesn’t consider himself a great artist or creator. Tyson shares his experiences with depression, how it’s affected his life, and how he’s working through it.

Continue Reading…