Failure is part of the equation

Craig: Jean, I know I’m jumping around, but is there… imagine you’re a time machine. And could you have gone back and told yourself something back on the sofa to speak figuratively, that you think might’ve gotten you off the sofa sooner or something that would’ve motivated you?

Jean: Yeah, I think that failure is part of the equation. If you start something… if everything you do guarantees success, you’re not going to ever expand and do more. Also find something that’s really fun to do. So back in high school you have to go to PE and you’re doing these whatever things that you absolutely hate and there’s nothing really fun about it. And if you find something fun, this is what I tell my clients to find an activity you enjoy doing and you’re not really working out. Like I said, like the aerialists, I know they’re doing pull ups, they’re doing crazy amazing things. But no, they didn’t plan to do it. This is just their fun activity. So really find something that you really enjoy.

Craig: And how do you find that? Because somebody who is listening could take this as a tool that they wanted to use on themselves. But how do you find that in someone that you’re working with? So you meet a client and you see their physical limitations and you’re starting to think about programming. How do you figure out how to motivate them?

Jean: Oh, I talked to them about what they enjoy doing, whether they like being outdoors or… and I’ve actually convinced some of them to come try out this parkour class that they haven’t really taken me up on it, but they love the idea. So when I give them a program to go out the door themselves, it’s all very movement based. So you’re not ever just doing pull ups. You might be doing a catch ball against the wall and then you’re shuffle to the side to another catch fall and you got to duck under something and all of a sudden they’re having fun and they’re enjoying it and they’re laughing and they’re like, “Oh, I’ll do this.” So it’s really about sending people off with something that they want to do. And not like this drudgery there’s a book I read is by a skier, Mermer Blakeslee who’s on the national team, she’s amazing, but it used to be called In The Yikes Zone and it’s been renamed conversation with fear. But basically that we all have this little fear box and if we don’t make the fear box bigger, it gets smaller and smaller. But you also have to be smart about going into your fear and her point was that if you went into the fear too much, then you’d end up in the bar and your scotches zone instead of in your yikes zone. And that would be a really bad thing. So, and then you end up afraid to do anything. So you really have to know. And I do this with PK silver too. You push… you can encourage them to do something that’s scary to them but don’t keep them in that fear but also never going to come back but it, but it’s always exhilarating to say, “I did that and I conquered it and I’m okay and it, it was fun.”

Meet the team: Tracy

I have been impressed by many movers—their energy, creativity, independence, and exceptionalism. These individuals do tend to thrive in their local communities, but I believe we can all flourish faster by sharing ideas in a broader virtual space designed for that purpose—the Movers Mindset community.

~ Tracy – Research and analytics