Three words to describe your practice

Craig:
And of course, the final question, three words to describe your practice.

Georgia:
Struggle. Yes, struggle. Love. I know it sounds cheesy, but love not in the sense of just loving yourself, but also the love I’ve found in it, the people, the actual community of people I’ve met. There’s a lot of people that I’ve met that you just feel like, I’ve met so many people with so many connections, but I’ve made a family through it, I’ve had a partner through it, I’ve had some of my best friends through it. So love is definitely something I’ve found.


Then the third word, and this is more so to describe the sensation I feel when I let myself be, is flying. So when that sometimes comes up a lot when we’re training and stuff like that, or when someone will be talking about a movement or a jump I’m doing, and it’s like, I look back and you’re like, “Ah, I feel like I’m flying.” It’s not the sense of just because I’ve done a big jump or something like that, but when you feel that feeling of you are you, you’ve decided to do something, you’re going for it, and you’ve let yourself go in it, you feel like you’re flying.

Three words to describe your practice

Craig:
It’s really scary. The question contains the word practice. I’m going to ask you a question about your practice. You can interpret practice to mean your entire life, your parkour, whatever you like. And you don’t have to tell me what that is. Just use the question to do whatever you want to do with it. The question is, I always say, and of course the final question is three words to describe your practice.

Charlotte Miles:
Three minute pause. It’s definitely going to … Heart, story, strength.

Three words to describe your practice

Craig C:
And of course, the final question, three words to describe your practice.

Naomi Honey:
That’s so tough. All right. Three words to describe my practice. I would say playful. I really like to play around and have fun and have a nice time. To me, that is more important than anything else.

Naomi Honey:
Enthusiastic. I’m so enthusiastic. I love moving, and that’s not just … That’s the dance as well and everything. I really, really enjoy it. Naomi Honey:
went what we say to ourselves has a huge impact. And also, we think it’s completely rational and fair, and it’s not.

Craig C:
And of course, the final question, three words to describe your practice.

Naomi Honey:
That’s so tough. All right. Three words to describe my practice. I would say playful. I really like to play around and have fun and have a nice time. To me, that is more important than anything else.

Naomi Honey:
Enthusiastic. I’m so enthusiastic. I love moving, and that’s not just … That’s the dance as well and everything. I really, really enjoy it.

Three words to describe your practice

Craig:
Forgot about the tide, and of course the final question. Three words to describe your practice.

Andy Fisher:
Okay, I’m going to work on the assumption that my practice is defined by more than my physical movement, it’s my philosophy or approach in general. I have a tattoo on my right arm, and the top, it’s the date of my marriage, and at the bottom, it’s the date of my son’s birth, and in between, there are three phrases, and it’s basically the summation of my philosophy in life. It’s hard to read because it’s in Elvish. But essentially it says, ‘Be here now, Speak softly, or tread softly, speak kindly.’ Of those three, I think, ‘Be here now’ Would be my philosophy.

Craig:
Thank you very much. Andy, it’s been a pleasure.

Andy Fisher:
Thank you, it’s been great fun.

Three words to describe your practice

 
Craig:
And of course, the final question. Three words to describe your practice.

Kasturi:
Who am I? I think those three words… I took my sister to an exhibition that I believe was at the British Library and it was Alice in Wonderland and I’ve always found that children’s… supposedly what’s for children. Their animations, especially at the moment are geared towards concepts that are so hard for us to understand and explain and even as somebody who’s supposed to be able to, I guess, have some way of formulating things, there are certain things that are really, really hard to describe and I think that children’s films allow us to relate to coming of age things that in retrospect we realize was so hard, but we did it through constantly just changing. So, who am I? Those three words for me, I guess is something that needs to be asked before we do anything rather than every year.

Kasturi:
I set resolutions like everyone else, but I think, who am I today? Who am I now? Who was I yesterday? Those kinds of questions I find really important to normalize that we’re going to be different and manage expectations that we have of ourselves and of others and Alice in Wonderland for me was this massive journey of discovery with the most craziest of things that you could ever imagine and I’ll never forget the fat caterpillar that was just smoking there in the background making O’s and everything felt magical even though it was kind of really dark as well and lonely and scary and there was that duality of this fantastic piece of work, this fantastic book that took us somewhere else to ask the question that inherently I find is the cost of a lot of angst for everyone and a lot of my clients, so yeah.

Kasturi:
I think if we can make that question as magical, as exciting and as unpredictable as Alice in Wonderland and normalize that then maybe we won’t be so scared of the answer or the lack of the answer because sometimes we don’t know and that needs to be okay I guess.

Three words to describe your practice

Craig: And of course the final question, three words to describe your practice.

Andy: Seek the best. That’s my three words. And seek the best to me means don’t take people’s word for things. Just because somebody is your coach, just because somebody is telling you what to do because they’re better than you, don’t take that as Gospel. Just go and find out who is the best of the best of whatever it is that you’re trying to get. So if you’re trying to learn parkour, try and find out who are the best coaches in the world, in the world. It doesn’t matter in your area. You don’t have to actually go to that coach. But find out, how do they coach? Why do they coach? What makes them different between your coach and what they’re doing? Who is the best sports coaching or who is the best at training programming or getting stronger? Don’t limit yourself to just your little bubble. Think about in the world, who is the best? Seek the best.

Andy: That’s definitely the Mark Rippetoes and the strong fit guys. They’re the ones that I have found to be some of the best in the world. And so I’m trying to learn from them. But I would suggest anything you do in life, even if you don’t find them, at least that process is going to get you towards being better. So that’s my three words.

Three words to describe your practice

Craig: And of course, the final question, three words to describe your practice.

Steve: I thought about this before, because I was listening to your podcast and-

Craig: It’s become a thing.

Steve: … I was like, “What am I going to say for this?” Going around our entire conversation, especially around the culture of struggle and effort, I think what I would say for my three words is embrace the suck. Not in like a dirty way, in like a just lean into being bad at something because you’re not going to be good at everything you try the first time. I certainly wasn’t for parkour or for photos or video or anything. It took a lot of time for me to get good. I think you just need to embrace that and enjoy it. I mean, it’s going to be frustrating. It’s going to be terrible. You’re going to hate doing parkour. You’re going to hate other athletes. You’re going to hate the obstacles. You’re going to blame other people and other things and it’s slippery or I’m tired or I’m sore. But you should really just embrace it because it’s part of the process. I think part of the reason why I love parkour so much is because I have sweat and blood and tears to prove that it’s been an 11-year-long journey of me just struggling my way through this and being happy with some movements and being unhappy with others.

Steve: But I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I have some of the best friends of my life through this movement. I’ve seen things and traveled places I never would have gone had I not been connected to these amazing individuals and amazing athletes. I think just really … You can’t skip that part of the process. There’s no shortcuts, really. You have to embrace it and you have to work through it. Eventually, there’s a light at the end of the tunnel where you’re going to be satisfied with your movement but there’s still going to be days, even the best of athletes at the top level are going to have off days where they feel terrible but the beauty of parkour is just figuring out the process to get through that and find a way to be happy with your movement.

Craig: Thank you very much, Steve. It’s been a pleasure to talk to you.

Three words origin and purpose

The idea of selecting three words is an amazing tool. A few years back, Yann Hnautra spent significant time traveling in the United States teaching, but also trying to get a sense of what Art du Déplacement meant there, to those people practicing. Off to the side, at most of the events, someone (who was not Yann) took little cell phone videos where people were asked a series of questions. The idea was that he would be able to watch the videos to get a different viewpoint than he would when running events and training with people; Little moments of private candor as it were.

I was standing, being recorded, when I was introduced to this question. Something like, “how would you describe your practice in three words?” Honestly, I have no idea what I said—sometimes I think I should ask Yann to find my video, but I’m terrified to hear what I said even just those few years ago.

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