The Hero Forge




Andy Fisher:
Exactly, Dan was invited as a guest speaker to the Hero Roundtable, run by Matt Langdon. It’s a great event, it happens a couple of… Well, now more than a couple of times a year in different parts of the world. They were coming to the UK, and Matt had asked Dan, “Do you know anybody who might be to contribute to this? And given the weirdness of my journey, and the fact that Dan and I often sit down and talk philosophy, and all kinds of things, he put me forward.

Andy Fisher:
And I didn’t know what I had to say about heroism. I have no idea, what do you want me to talk about? And Dan said, “Well you’re going to have to figure that out, just go away and put…” The Hero Forge the book, was a book I wrote to figure out what I wanted to say on that stage in a five to 10-minute talk. Now it became far more than that, but that was the impetus. I need to write to figure out what I have to say. It came at a really poignant point in my life, in that I become a dad, and I became a dad quite late. I was 44, when my dad had me, he was 26, and my father was dying of cancer.

Andy Fisher:
It came at this point where I realized that the chances are that I won’t be able to mentor my son all the way through adulthood, in the way that my father had with me. Because I started later- and who knows how short Your life is you know, things change. I started thinking, ‘What would be the legacy, the message that I’d want to leave Kit, my son, on what it is to be a good man, and to lead a good life, and to make a difference? The Hero Forge became the instruction manual that I’d want to leave to my son of here’s what I figured out. Not necessarily that I embody or live, but what I think are some of the answers to living a life where you are able to look back and go, “I’m comfortable without it.”

Craig:
Life well lived.

Andy Fisher:
Exactly, yeah, and heroism for me has always been a verb, not a noun. It’s a doing thing, and it’s transitory, and so it was about how do you conduct yourself on this journey through life.

Andy Fisher:
I wrote the book, I wrote what I had to say, and then I went along and delivered this talk at the Barbican in London. Which we’re not too far away from now actually.

Craig:
I’m like, “Hey, well that’s where we-“

Andy Fisher:
Isn’t that strange? Yeah, we’ve come full circle.

Andy Fisher:
And it went down well, and then I stayed in touch with Matt, and I realized that the most useful thing. Well, the thing I enjoyed most about that journey, was actually meeting other people who I’d talked to about this, and they were remarkable people, and I thought. ‘Well, maybe this is the, it could be the beginning of an ongoing conversation [crosstalk 00:28:48] not the end of it.’ The podcast emerged out of that, and yeah, I never intended it to be something that went on forever.

Andy Fisher:
It was going to go on for as long as the energy was there, and I felt that I had something of value to add to it, and I interviewed just remarkable people, and it was as you say, it was, I didn’t realize that the pace I was setting was by most people’s standards, unrealistic. It was just once a week I committed to put something out, It had to happen in the evenings and weekends, and usually, the people I was talking to were in different time zones. All the production of that was all a one-man team, the social media, everything I did myself. I came to a natural end at that point, I went out with Dan again, we both presented a Roundtable in San Francisco, which was April last year I think.

Craig:
I believe so, I seriously considered getting a plane ticket. I was like, “Oh.” But I was really busy in April.

Andy Fisher:
It was wonderful, and I got to meet Phil Zimbardo, and it just… Incredible people, we had a wonderful time, I went to Alcatraz, and I had a couple of days of being at a play there as well, and when I came back, I just had this feeling like, ‘I think I’m probably done on this now. I think, what I had to say, and what I had to contribute.’

Meet the team: Ruby

This project is attractive to me because I am able to take part in this epic feat of making and spreading pieces of parkour history. By preserving the words and experiences of the world’s top practitioners, and giving a platform for people of all backgrounds to share their journey, we’re able to provide an environment where movement enthusiasts can build relationships along the way. Movers Mindset is a truly amazing community to be part of.

~ Ruby – Archivist and movement researcher