Three words to describe your practice

Craig: Thanks for sharing. And of course, the final question, three words to describe your practice.

Amos: I would say for me, the experiences that just stick so far beyond the rest of my experience with parkour are those days where there’s no pressure to go work on some project, you’re not trying to film anything, you’re not trying to teach some group. It’s just going out with your friends, it’s a beautiful day, maybe the sun’s going down, there’s a nice breeze. And you’re laughing, and just trying things that you’ve never done before, and it gives you a sense of empowerment and leveling-up. But at the same time, you’re being goofy about it. There’s just no pressure, and it’s just pure enjoyment of moving one’s body and challenging one’s mind.

Amos: And so I think out of my wide ranging experience of parkour, if I said three words that would capture my ideal parkour experience, it would be passion, love, and laughter.

Craig: Thank you very much, Amos. It’s been a pleasure.

Amos: Yeah, man. It’s been a pleasure.

The podcast is made possible by your voluntary subscriptions

Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter how passionate we are or how lofty are our goals. The podcast is made possible by voluntary subscriptions from listeners like you. Cultural expectations demand that the podcast be free-to-listen. But if you value the podcast, you should avoid the tragedy-of-the-commons by contributing your support. “Someone else will support the project,” means the podcast is not sustainable.

Please take a moment to read about becoming a voluntary subscriber.

On training methodology

Craig: Training methodology, I don’t get this, people always want to talk about “I want to know how so-and-so trains, if they keep a journal.” I’m going to guess that you’re not training like you have a schedule, like “From 8:00 to 10:00, I’m doing this. And next week, I’m doing climb-ups.”

Amos: My training has been very different recently, because unfortunately the last three years I’ve been injured. That’s also something not many people know about me. It’s definitely been a rough ride, but like most things in my life, I’m very grateful for where I’m at. I have a working body, I’m so happy with what I have. But my training did change, before that, I would just play a lot. But then if I ever had a project in mind, I was pretty methodical. I’d spend a lot of time working certain lines. So I had two dance injuries, one, I don’t know if I can call one of them dance, it was like goofing off. I was trying to make this girl laugh, and I fell in weird way, and got my foot caught on this wall. I just fell in an odd way, and it hurt my knee, and I ended up sustaining a year-and-a-half injury from it. She didn’t even laugh.

Continue Reading…

On goals

Craig: If you get up and you have a free day, which maybe all eight of them, that’s awesome, if you get up and you have a free day, do you have “My goal is to be the emperor, so here’s my 12-year plan.” Or do you just “What do I want to do today?” Because I’ve been to Boulder enough to know there’s a different vibe here, I’m from the East Coast where I did a three-point-K-turn when I missed a thing, and I’m just like, “I’m doing the turn.” And everybody was like, “It’s all good, bro. Go ahead.” And I was just like, “Oh right, this is not the East Coast.” Do you set out with goals, or do you just go whichever way the wind blows you?

Amos: I see value in both, and I’m actually a huge fan of both. I won’t dodge it. I think back to something a lot of people don’t know about me, most of my 20s, I was homeless, and I lived on the street, I traveled on my bicycle, ate out of the trash. That whole gig, very different life.

Continue Reading…

048. Amos Rendao: Full transcript

Craig: Welcome to the Movers Mindset podcast, where I interview movement enthusiasts to find out who they are, what they do, and why they do it. Today, Amos Rendao reflects on what music means to him, flowing versus planning, and the benefits and importance of journaling. The conversation turns to the idea of success and what that means, before moving to aikido and information activism. Amos shares his insights on diet and nutrition, his journey with injuries and recovery, and how he manages self-talk.

Craig: Hello, I’m Craig Constantine.

Amos: What’s up, Craig?

Craig: Amos Rendao is a professional coach, athlete, entrepreneur, business manager, and co-founder of APEX School of Movement and Parkour EDU. He considers himself a movement scientist, and his experimentation and study of movement led him to create the Parkour Ukemi and Randori programs. Amos is an active member of both his local and national parkour communities, and a board member of USPK. Welcome, Amos.

Continue Reading…

049. Ryan Ford: Coaching methods, talent hotbeds, and cryptocurrency

049. Ryan Ford: Coaching methods, talent hotbeds, and cryptocurrency

 
 
00:00 / 1:03:27
 
1X
 

Ryan Ford shares his thoughts on his Parkour EDU program, various coaching methods, and his experience of building a community. He discusses the idea of a talent hotbed, how and why it occurs, and how to apply those ideas, before delving into the world of crypto-currency. Ryan explains what crypto currency is, why he’s so interested in it, its potential for growth, and the similarities he sees between crypto and parkour. 

Continue Reading…

048. Amos Rendao: Journaling, nutrition, and self talk

048. Amos Rendao: Journaling, nutrition, and self talk

 
 
00:00 / 1:29:24
 
1X
 

Amos Rendao reflects on what music means to him, flowing vs planning, and the benefits and importance of journalling. The conversation turns to the idea of success and what that means, before moving to Aikido, and information activism. Amos shares his insights on diet and nutrition, his journey with injuries and recovery, and how he manages self talk.

Continue Reading…

047. Lynn Jung: Full transcript

Craig: Welcome to the Movers Mindset podcast, where I interview movement enthusiasts to find out who they are, what they do and why they do it.

Craig: In this episode, Lynn Jung discusses Brighton, what it means to her and how moving there affected her life. She unpacks how she approaches training, her movement background and her journey of injury and recovery over the past few years. Lynn shares how she came to Freerunning, her current projects and her involvement with Storm Freerun and XDubai.

Craig: Hello, I’m Craig Constantine.

Lynn: Hello.

Craig: Lynn Jung is a professional Parkour athlete and coach, and the sole female member of the renowned Storm Freerun. Originally from Luxembourg her diverse movement background includes gymnastics, dance and circus, in addition to parkour. Lynn performs and competes around the world and is a sponsored athlete with XDubai. Welcome, Lynn.

Lynn: Thank you.

Craig: Lynn, I had a chance to see you and some of your friends on the beach a little bit and some of them were working on flips and things, and it was really, I think it’s a privilege to go and visit people that we interview, and I’m wondering, can you share a little bit of how you think of Brighton and the people that you train with? I know you have a close-knit group of friends. Can you just unpack that for people who are listening to get a feel for what is Lynn doing on a daily basis?

Continue Reading…

Three words to describe your practice

Craig: And of course, the final question. Three words to describe your practice.

Lynn: I’d say patience, it’s the first word that comes into my mind after two years of struggling with an injury. I did learn how to be patient. I had no choice.

Lynn: Then I would say passion. I’m very passionate about what I do. I do believe that if you’re not passionate about something, it’s impossible to stick with it and do a good job. I think you only do a good job if you actually do it with heart. So I think I’m very passionate about what I do.

Lynn: And the third thing, how would I describe my practice, I would say it’s very social. Even though I’m a very individual person and I do like my quiet, I think my practice most of the time is very social. When I think about training it usually comes with thinking about hanging out with people that I really like, so, even on days I don’t train, I still join that practice maybe to hang out. It’s just my… pretty much my whole life evolves around movement and I’m very happy that that’s the way it is.

Craig: Thank you very much, Lynn. It’s been a pleasure.

Lynn: Thanks for having me.

047. Lynn Jung: Training, recovery, and goals

047. Lynn Jung: Training, recovery, and goals

 
 
00:00 / 40:18
 
1X
 

Lynn Jung discusses Brighton, what it means to her, and how moving there affected her life. She unpacks how she approaches training, her movement background, and her journey of injury and recovery over the past few years. Lynn shares how she came to freerunning, her current projects, and her involvement with Storm Freerun and xDubai.

Continue Reading…

046. Jean Lam: Full transcript

Craig: Welcome to the Movers Mindset podcast where I interview movement enthusiasts to find out who they are, what they do and why they do it. Today, Jean Lam reflects on how she became interested in fitness and eventually joined the industry, her love of movement and what sports and activities she’s involved in now. Jean discusses corrective exercise and shares her insights on programing, motivation and scope of practice. She goes into injury and rehab before explaining how she keeps up with coaching best practices.

Craig: Hello, I’m Craig Constantine.

Jean: Hi, I’m Jean Lam.

Craig: Jean Lamb is a fitness professional and has been in the field for nearly two decades. Her wide array of certifications has allowed her to work with all ages and abilities from children to senior citizens. Jean has worked with many different areas of fitness and types of movement, most recently as a ski instructor at Liberty Mountain as well as in the aerial silks and the PK move board.

Craig: Welcome Jean.

Jean: Thank you.

Craig: Jean, in the introduction I just skipped over super highlighting all of the various certifications and group physical classes you’ve taught because you’ve done so much. It’s almost impossible to summarize in a couple sentences. So could you maybe first unpack a little bit some of your background and just what really interests you about movement?

Continue Reading…

Failure is part of the equation

Craig: Jean, I know I’m jumping around, but is there… imagine you’re a time machine. And could you have gone back and told yourself something back on the sofa to speak figuratively, that you think might’ve gotten you off the sofa sooner or something that would’ve motivated you?

Jean: Yeah, I think that failure is part of the equation. If you start something… if everything you do guarantees success, you’re not going to ever expand and do more. Also find something that’s really fun to do. So back in high school you have to go to PE and you’re doing these whatever things that you absolutely hate and there’s nothing really fun about it. And if you find something fun, this is what I tell my clients to find an activity you enjoy doing and you’re not really working out. Like I said, like the aerialists, I know they’re doing pull ups, they’re doing crazy amazing things. But no, they didn’t plan to do it. This is just their fun activity. So really find something that you really enjoy.

Continue Reading…