Inconsistent yet persistent

This article is based on the episode, Tuline Kinaci: Tantra, authenticity, and eye contact


Tuline Kinaci is an all-around mover, a dancer, rock climber, traceusse and earned her degree in athletic training. In addition to her movement practices, Tuline is a certified authentic Tantra instructor, teaching holistic healing of body, mind, spirit and sex. Tuline considers herself a sex activist and is the founder of LoveCraft, a sexual coaching and empowerment collective.

Tantra was the obvious place to begin since we were surely going to end up talking about tantric sex. My fear was that most people’s—myself included—knowledge of Tantra would be something to do with the artist, Sting. We immediately agreed that leaving the world only knowing about “men in linen pants” would be a disservice.

Tantra means, literally, to weave light and sound with form, the light being visualizations of your chakras in your body, sound being chants that you’re making, and then the form being your body, your physical body. That’s it, in a nutshell. The way that often looks is meditating. The way a lot of people do that is they’ll meditate and then have sex; they’ll meditate during sex; they’ll meditate on their own without any sex. Yeah, that’s kind of that, which means nothing, right? It’s like a, ‘Cool, and then what?’ which is what got me into having a coach.

~ Tuline Kinaci from, ~4’40”
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Episode 100, season 5, and episode numbering

100!

Craig Constantine: Experience, pruning, and benefit is the one-hundredth episode of the Movers Mindset podcast.

Season 5

Depending on where you listen, and what software you’re using, you may not be seeing the season numbers. Instead of making this episode be the end of season 4, I decided—at the literal last-second as I was hovering on the “publish” button—to make it be the beginning of season 5. I feel that conveys what’s really going on with Movers Mindset. The next conversations to be recorded are in the works, etc.

Episode numbers in our titles

Our titles will no longer start with the episode number. Seems like a trivial change, right? It is only a few characters, sure, but like “this episode begins season 5, rather than ends season 4,” it’s the right thing to do.

If you’re talking to me, in real life, and we get onto the topic of some person or episode… the important thing is not that “it’s episode 63.” The important thing is the person in the conversation. (The guest I mean. I’m continuously trying to squirm into the back seat.) Here’s a list of the last ten episodes to show you what I mean:

91: John Beede: Mountaineering, values, and growth
92: Amy Slevin: Flow Motion, pain, and routines
93: Mark Balfe-Taylor: Yoga, intuition, and discipline
94: Renae Dambly: Self care, perception, and competition
95: Howard ‘Cosmo’ Palmer: Mindfulness, intention, and cosmonauts 96: Vivian Carrasco: Mindset, transformation, and practice
97: Kyle Koch: Training, nature, and tracking
98: André Miller: Systema, farming, and philosophy
99: Josh Wit: Diabetes, training, and balance
100: Craig Constantine: Experience, pruning, and benefit

Based on what you see above, what’s the LEAST important thing from each of those lines? It’s the rightmost bits. Let’s trim off the 3 themes— “Mountaineering, values, and growth” is less important than “John Beede”, and soon…

91: John Beede
92: Amy Slevin
93: Mark Balfe-Taylor
94: Renae Dambly
95: Howard ‘Cosmo’ Palmer 96: Vivian Carrasco
97: Kyle Koch
98: André Miller
99: Josh Wit
100: Craig Constantine

You see where I’m going with this? Hierarchy implies that, “John Beede” is less important than . . .

91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100

And you’re saying, “Craig, obviously the least important bit is the episode number.”

QED

People, themes, 3-words

As soon as I write this…

John Beede: Mountaineering, values, and growth
Amy Slevin: Flow Motion, pain, and routines
Mark Balfe-Taylor: Yoga, intuition, and discipline
Renae Dambly: Self care, perception, and competition
Howard ‘Cosmo’ Palmer: Mindfulness, intention, and cosmonauts Vivian Carrasco: Mindset, transformation, and practice
Kyle Koch: Training, nature, and tracking
André Miller: Systema, farming, and philosophy Josh Wit: Diabetes, training, and balance
Craig Constantine: Experience, pruning, and benefit

You start to think…

make is scrollable
make it searchable
let me navigate through titles, people, themes (the list just above)… but also navigate through 3-words (you can do this already),
…and the chapter titles
…and maybe some other things too.

All of which is doable. But it takes time and money. (Reminder: please support us on https://patreon.com/moversmindset&nbsp😉

So, as trivial as it seems, removing the episode numbers is just the next step in making my focus be on the people and themes of the podcast.

Suddenly

Episode numbers—everywhere I see them—look gaudy to me.

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I am not afraid to talk about suicide

After recording the episode, Charlotte Miles: Motivation, emotional recovery, and purpose, Charlotte took the time to write this accompanying article after recording her episode, to share more of her thoughts on suicide.


I Am NOT Afraid to Talk About Suicide

Shame is a powerful thing. It can turn the strongest of us to blubbering wrecks, it can freeze our bodies to the spot, cause us to retreat in on ourselves, to grow small and even act completely in opposition to our nature. Shame silences us. It convinces us that we’re alone and this alienation only drives us deeper into solitude.

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Follow up with Jesse Danger

We asked Jesse Danger some follow up questions, that we didn’t have the chance to discuss in his episode, Jesse Danger: Systems thinking, game design, and novelty. Here are the questions, and his responses to them:

How do you stay motivated, and how do you convert inspiration into motivation?

I think that around motivation, I’m grateful for whenever it shows up on its own. I find especially when I’m unmotivated, the best thing for me is sticking to my routine. I really subscribe to this idea from The War of Art that inspiration strikes every day at 9:00 AM. This idea that you have to go to work every day, even if you identify as an artist, maybe especially if you identify as an artist, and you can set up the conditions for exploration and growth, but you still have to jump in and do it. And I’ve found through every single training session that no matter how I feel before the session, afterwards, I’m happy to have done it. I’ve done something new, I’ve challenged myself, and I’ve become stronger. So anytime that I can jump in and do the damn thing, in training, or in work and in life, I feel better for it, and that really helps me to stop from seeing motivation as some fleeting, beautiful sunlight through the lens, and see it as something that I can control and participate in.

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